Yay! I found a natural deodorant that actually works!

Now, I know this isn't the most glamorous of topics, but I strive to make my corner of the internet as real as possible. Do I take flat lays? Yes. Do I talk about the fact that I am pretty prone to sweatiness? Apparently also yes. I've told you all before how this journey to find a decent natural deodorant has led me down many a stinky pathway. So even though this post isn't about a press trip to Cannes, I'm still pretty bloody excited to share it with you for the sake of armpits everywhere.

I started using Pitrok a few months back after falling down the conscious living online rabbit hole and finding out about the ingredients that are common in most antiperspirant. Knowing that the armpits house one of the highest concentrations of lymph nodes on the body, I decided that I wanted to avoid putting things like aluminium in that area. And since I already have a completely natural skin-care regime my deodorant seemed like the next place to start making some changes.


Coping and Creating

This morning I woke up convinced that today would be the day that my life got back to "normal". After spending 24 hours with a heavy chest and a lump in my throat, I thought that I would wake up and my routines would be restored. I was going to schedule tweets, write blog posts and get back to doing my job. It was what I was craving and what I thought I needed.

But as much as I want to be able to create, I simply can't do it. Despite the fact that I have a list about as long as my arm of posts that I want to write, doing so seems impossible following Monday's tragic events. Normal seems unattainable knowing about all of the lives that have been changed forever or lost. I'm not sure how, but I really believed (or maybe just hoped) that the start of a new day would mean an entirely new mindset. Instead, it just meant waking up to yet more stories of loss.

No seriously, register to vote.

Google Analytics tells me that the vast majority of my readers are between the ages of 18 and 24, which just so happens to also be the group of people least likely to vote in the UK's upcoming general election. So, if you are under the age of 25, living in the UK and eligible to vote, this one is just for you. You should feel very special.

I'm going to put it simply: Get your national insurance number, sit your arse down and register to vote. Now. You can even click straight off this page to do so. And if I'm willing to mess with my bounce rates then you know this has to be very important.

https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote

My realistic self-care routine

I think it's safe to say that 'wellness' is having a bit of a moment as far as the internet is concerned.  Yoga, meditation, chia seeds - you can log onto Instagram pretty confident that you're going to see at least one of them on your feed. Don't get me wrong, I love that the conversation about self-care has opened up so drastically in the past couple of years and it's great to see people trying to fight against the glorification of being busy. But, as with most 'trends', I can't help but feel that it doesn't represent much variety.

The truth is that "self-care" means something different to everyone. It's not a term that can only be used in regards to positive affirmations and overpriced green juice. Sometimes it looks more like binging on Netflix and whipping up some gourmet beans on toast. Unfortunately, with all of the Instagramable self-care that is floating around, it's easy to feel guilty that you're first instinct after a bad day isn't to downward dog.


My blogging journey

When I first started blogging I was 15-years-old and it was 2012. Yep, that was around the time of the American Apparel disco pants (and all of its cheaper, almost see-through alternatives), Jeffrey Campbell Lita boots and an online community who decided to dive all the way into pastel coloured hair. From that moment on, blogging kind of became a second home for me.

Before Curly and Wordy was born I was a fashion blogger. I know. Even I find it weird to think about. Just imagine lots of wishlist posts (wishing is all you can do when you're attempting to fund a blossoming eye for trends on £20 a month's worth of pocket money) and OOTDs which I shot on my iPhone 3GS using nothing but self-timer mode and patience. The reasons I decided to go in the direction of fashion were two-fold. Firstly, I genuinely believed that I was destined to be the next editor of British Vogue because, at the time, clothes were the way that I expressed myself creatively. And secondly, well, I thought that the only type of blogs were fashion and beauty blogs and I sure as hell knew that I couldn't do eyeliner.


Life update: I'm scared of losing my independence

When I jotted down this post idea in my blog planner, I had no idea that it would end up being as emotionally charged as it is. To be honest, I was expecting an extended version of "Lol when I'm at uni I'm a 20-year-old who is #bossing it in London, but when I'm back home I feel akin to a toddler who isn't even sure how to make herself pesto pasta without adult supervision". But, as it turns out, the dissonance between my home life and my uni life is a bit more of a problem than I even realised. Apparently, I have way more to say than I first expected. Oh, blogging, I'm endlessly impressed by your cathartic qualities.

So, to put it simply, I feel like I'm a different person when I'm at university. Or perhaps my perception of myself just changes, because although my core principles remain the same, I certainly feel different within myself. Mainly, I feel like the best (the most productive, the most active, the most independent) version of me when I'm at uni. I think it mainly relies on the routines that I've created for myself since starting uni. It's these daily habits that make me feel like I'm capable of not only being alone, but thriving alone. But the scary thing is that I think my routines have stopped being just that and started to be a part of my personality. They're no longer something that simply aids me, but something that I rely on.


Some complaints about complaining


Sometimes I feel like university isn’t actually about getting a degree, but more about complaining so much about getting your degree that people respect your hard work. If we’re not moaning about the 2,000 words we have due in by 2pm, we’re bitching about being broke or waving our timetables in everybody’s face whilst screaming “three 9ams in one week!”. In fact, I’m pretty sure that complaining about uni life makes up a solid 75% of our go-to conversation topics. Yes, we did willingly sign up for this experience. Yes, we are paying £9,000 a year to be a part of it. But no, apparently that isn’t going to stop us from trying to convince each other that it is the single most horrific thing in existence.

If you hadn’t figured it out yet from the tone of that sassy little opening paragraph, I’m kind of exhausted by all of the complaining. Not only am I bored of hearing it, but I’m also bored of being an active participant in it, be it around other uni students or just in general life. So, am I complaining about complaining? Well, actually, yes and I am fully aware of the irony. But I hope that this blog post has a bit more direction and purpose than most bitch sessions, because it’s a topic that I’ve been contemplating a lot recently and I think I’ve finally come to some conclusions. The kind of conclusions that are actually changing the way I live my life.  

How to survive exams with The UniBox

It's that time of the year when I can practically smell the stress as I walk through campus in the form of to-go coffees and dry shampoo because, seriously, who has the time to shower when you've got 3,000 words to write in 2 hours? The library is so full that I'm worried about its structural integrity, I haven't seen my flat mates in well over 48 hours and I'm struggling to understand why we actually pay to put ourselves through this. But, alas, deadline/exam season is well and truly upon us and there's no escaping it.

Luckily though, I've teamed up with The UniBox* this month to show you some of my sure-fire ways to survive cramming sessions, as well as to show off their glorious Exam Survival box. For those of you that don't know, The UniBox is a lifestyle subscription service created just for students. That means that if you sign up you can get a selection of gifts delivered to your doorstep every single month. Yep, it is pretty much like Christmas all year round but without having to deal with your aunt asking if you're still single. After having a look at some of their incredible boxes from past months, I just knew that I had to get my hands on this one, which has been created especially to keep you motivated and calm as those deadlines loom closer. So, today I'm going to share with you how you can incorporate this month's items into an exam-season routine like no other.


What Second year taught me

A few days ago I handed in my final essay for the second year of my BA in English Lit and experienced that exhilaration (and mild peril) that accompanies knowing I have four months ahead of me with no essays, no set routines, and no particularly academic goals. Clicking 'submit' on those last 2,500 words really made it hit home: I'm 2/3 of the way through my university life. I only have one year left of being in education, which is pretty much all I've known since I was 5 years old.

Adulthood? Nah, I'm alright thanks.

But it also got me thinking about just how much I've changed since I was that little Fresher. I feel like second year has been the year of personal growth and finally getting properly into the swing of independent living. I think I might have even got to grips with how much pasta is needed for one person which, frankly, is a miracle! So, since it is a tradition, I thought I would share with you all of the lessons that this academic year has taught me.


4 things that annoy me about blogging

As you've probably guessed by now, I'm pretty fond of blogging. I've been a member of the gang since I was a 14-year-old with but a Jeffery Campbell Lita boot shaped twinkle in my eye and a Look magazine in my school backpack. This side of the internet has provided me with more joy than I could ever have expected when I pressed publish on my first ever post on my first ever blog (it was a riveting read on how I would be mixing the stud and pastels trends of 2012 together that I will most definitely not be linking here). The point is, I've made friends, discovered passions within myself that I didn't even know existed and even created a part-time job for myself whilst I'm studying. I owe a lot to the world of blogging.

That being said, I don't mind admitting that aspects of it have slightly pissed me off in recent months. And by "slightly" I mean, "enough for me to writing a blog post about it instead of watching Jane the Virgin".


Girl Love #9

Some days I wake up and feel like I've hit the ground running. I get out of bed, pour myself a glass of cranberry juice (gotta keep that urinary tract in order, ladies) and am pretty much instantly ticking things off my to-do list. And you guys know how much of a thrill I get from ticking things off my to-do list. Other days...not so much.

Like yesterday, for example. It was rainy outside and my motivation was at a solid 0.8/10. So, I stayed in bed, watched Jane the Virgin and ate Quality Street until I only had the strawberry creams left. But I think it's safe to say that I needed it because I had the best night's sleep I've had in what feels like years. I think that I'm slowly but surely learning that my self-worth is not dependent on my productivity. I'm coming to terms with the fact that, not only are self-care days okay, but that they are completely necessary. It was bloody glorious to have a total lazy day and it's left me feeling pumped to face what I'm hoping will be a productive Friday.


Social media and my creativity

Since the beginning of the year and resolving that I would spend less time on my phone in 2017, I've been thinking a lot about the role that social media plays in my life. I've become acutely aware of just how rocky our relationship is. On the one hand, it's a huge part of my business and allows me to work from home whilst I'm studying. On the other, one of my favourite things to use it for is to watch people cutting sand in Instagram videos. It walks a weird and fine line between work and relaxation which can make getting pretty much anything - be it writing a blog post or actually switching off at the end of the day - that little bit more complicated.

Whilst it's great to feel like a tweet-scheduling powerhouse, I do find that the almost constant presence of social media in my life makes grasping hold of rare moments of creative inspiration even more difficult. Being the infuriatingly introspective person that I am, I've given a tonne of thought to why this might be and have pretty much concluded that the reasons are threefold.


Lube and why you need to check the label

Lube has got a pretty bad rep. Well, everything related to sex has a pretty bad rep in this society, but lube particularly so. I don’t know whether it’s because people think that women should be capable of being wet at the drop of a hat on a 24/7 basis or just because people get nervous talking about bodily functions. Either way, it carries with it a massive stigma that means a lot of people are embarrassed to buy it, let alone whip it out in the bedroom. For the sake of orgasms everywhere, that’s something that needs to stop.

If you’ve never used the stuff before, then forget what your pride is trying to tell you because it’s going to change your life. Or at least your sex life. Not only does extra slide make for a more pleasurable experience all round, but the lack of resistance makes it less likely that you will experience the pure fear of a broken condom. Plus, if you know what it feels like to have a bladder that is akin to the fiery pits of hell, you’ll be happy to know that a smoother experience can help to lower the chance of contracting a UTI. Win, win, win.